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  • »Inselmensch« ist der Autor dieses Themas

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1

Sonntag, 22. September 2013, 11:42

2. Weltkrieg / japanische Aerzte

Verzeihung, falls schon gepostet. Hatte ich eben erst woanders gefunden. Geht u.a. um die Philippinen.

Quelle: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-…l#ixzz0edyfyKOo

Doctors of Depravity

By CHRISTOPHER HUDSON

Last updated at 23:50 02 March 2007









After more than 60 years of silence, World War II's most
enduring and horrible secret is being nudged into the light of day.
One by one the participants, white-haired and mildmannered, line up
to tell their dreadful stories before they die.

Akira Makino is a frail widower living near Osaka in Japan. His
only unusual habit is to regularly visit an obscure little town in
the southern Philippines, where he gives clothes to poor children
and has set up war memorials.

Mr Makino was stationed there during the war. What he never told
anybody, including his wife, was that during the four months before
Japan's defeat in March 1945, he dissected ten Filipino prisoners
of war, including two teenage girls. He cut out their livers,
kidneys and wombs while they were still alive. Only when he cut
open their hearts did they finally perish.

These barbaric acts were, he said this week, "educational", to
improve his knowledge of anatomy. "We removed some of the organs
and amputated legs and arms. Two of the victims were young women,
18 or 19 years old. I hesitate to say it but we opened up their
wombs to show the younger soldiers. They knew very little about
women - it was sex education."

Why did he do it? "It was the order of the emperor, and the
emperor was a god. I had no choice. If I had disobeyed I would have
been killed." But the vivisections were also a revenge on the
"enemy" - Filipino tribespeople whom the Japanese suspected of
spying for the Americans.

Mr Makino's prisoners seem to have been luckier than some: he
anaesthetised them before cutting them up. But the secret
government department which organised such experiments in
Japanese-occupied China took delight in experimenting on their
subjects while they were still alive.

A jovial old Japanese farmer who in the war had been a medical
assistant in a Japanese army unit in China described to a U.S.
reporter recently what it was like to dissect a Chinese prisoner
who was still alive.

Munching rice cakes, he reminisced: "The fellow knew it was over
for him, and so he didn't struggle when they led him into the room
and tied him down. But when I picked up the scalpel, that's when he
began screaming. I cut him open from the chest to the stomach and
he screamed terribly, and his face was all twisted in agony.

"He made this unimaginable sound, he was screaming so horribly.
But then finally he stopped.

"This was all in a day's work for the surgeons, but it really
left an impression on me because it was my first time." The man
could not be sedated, added the farmer, because it might have
distorted the experiment.

The place where these atrocities occurred was an undercover
medical experimentation unit of the Imperial Japanese Army. It was
known officially as the Anti-Epidemic Water Supply and Purification
Bureau - but all the Japanese who worked there knew it simply as
Unit 731.

It had been set up as a biological warfare unit in 1936 by a
physician and army officer, Shiro Ishii. A graduate of Kyoto
Imperial University, Ishii had been attracted to germ warfare by
the 1925 Geneva Protocol banning biological weapons. If they had to
be banned under international law, reasoned Ishii, they must be
extremely powerful.

Ishii prospered under the patronage of Japan's army minister. He
invented a water filter which was used by the army, and allegedly
demonstrated its effectiveness to Emperor Hirohito by urinating
into it and offering the results to the emperor to drink. Hirohito
declined, so Ishii drank it himself.

A swashbuckling womaniser who could afford to frequent Tokyo's
upmarket geisha houses, Ishii remained assiduous in promoting the
cause of germ warfare. His chance came when the Japanese invaded
Manchuria, the region in eastern China closest to Japan, and turned
it into a puppet state.

Given a large budget by Tokyo, Ishii razed eight villages to
build a huge compound - more than 150 buildings over four square
miles - at Pingfan near Harbin, a remote, desolate part of the
Manchurian Peninsula.

Complete with an aerodrome, railway line, barracks, dungeons,
laboratories, operating rooms, crematoria, cinema, bar and Shinto
temple, it rivalled for size the Na!zis' infamous death camp of
Auschwitz-Birkenau.

The numbers of prisoners were lower. From 1936 to 1942 between
3,000 and 12,000 men, women and children were murdered in Unit 731.
But the atrocities committed there were physically worse

than in the Na!zi death camps. Their suffering lasted much longer
- and not one prisoner survived.

At Unit 731, Ishii made his mission crystal clear. "A doctor's
God-given mission is to block and treat disease," he told his
staff, "but the work on which we are now to embark is the complete
opposite of those principles."

The strategy was to develop biological weapons which would
assist the Japanese army's invasion of south-east China, towards
Peking.

There were at least seven other units dotted across
Japanese-occupied Asia, but they all came under Ishii's command.
One studied plagues; another ran a bacteria factory; another
conducted experiments in human food and water deprivation, and
waterborne typhus.

Another factory back in Japan produced chemical weapons for the
army. Typhoid, cholera and dysentery bacteria were farmed for
battlefield use.

Most of these facilities were combined at Unit 731 so that Ishii
could play with his box of horrors. His word was law. When he
wanted a human brain to experiment on, guards grabbed a prisoner
and held him down while one of them cleaved open his skull with an
axe. The brain was removed and rushed to Ishii's laboratory.

Human beings used for experiments were nicknamed "maruta" or
"logs" because the cover story given to the local authorities was
that Unit 731 was a lumber mill. Logs were inert matter, a form of
plant life, and that was how the Japanese regarded the Chinese
"bandits", "criminals" and "suspicious persons" brought in from the
surrounding countryside.

Shackled hand and foot, they were fed well and exercised
regularly. "Unless you work with a healthy body you can't get
results," recalled a member of the Unit.

But the torture inflicted upon them is unimaginable: they were
exposed to phosgene gas to discover the effect on their lungs, or
given electrical charges which slowly roasted them. Prisoners were
decapitated in order for Japanese soldiers to test the sharpness of
their swords.

Others had limbs amputated to study blood loss - limbs that were
sometimes stitched back on the opposite sides of the body. Other
victims had various parts of their brains, lungs or liver removed,
or their stomach removed and their oesophagus reattached to their
intestines.

Kamada, one of several veterans who felt able to speak out after
the death of Emperor Hirohito, remembered extracting the
plague-infested organs of a fully conscious "log" with a
scalpel.

"I inserted the scalpel directly into the log's neck and opened
the chest," he said. "At first there was a terrible scream, but the
voice soon fell silent."

Other experiments involved hanging prisoners upside down to
discover how long it took for them to choke to death, and injecting
air into their arteries to test for the onset of embolisms.

Some appear to have had no medical purpose except the
administering of indescribable pain, such as injecting horse urine
into prisoners' kidneys.

Those which did have a genuine medical value, such as finding
the best treatment for frostbite - a valuable discovery for troops
in the bitter Manchurian winters - were achieved by gratuitously
cruel means.

On the frozen fields at Pingfan, prisoners were led out with
bare arms and drenched with cold water to accelerate the freezing
process.

Their arms were then hit with a stick. If they gave off a hard,
hollow ring, the freezing process was complete. Separately, naked
men and women were subjected to freezing temperatures and then
defrosted to study the effects of rotting and gangrene on the
flesh.

People were locked into high-pressure chambers until their eyes
popped out, or they were put into centrifuges and spun to death
like a cat in a washing machine. To study the effects of untreated
venereal disease, male and female "logs" were deliberately infected
with syphilis.

Ishii demanded a constant intake of prisoners, like a modern-day
Count Dracula scouring the countryside for blood. His victims were
tied to stakes to find the best range for flame-throwers, or used
to test grenades and explosives positioned at different angles and
distances. They were used as targets to test chemical weapons; they
were bombarded with anthrax.

All of these atrocities had been banned by the Geneva
Convention, which Japan signed but did not ratify. By a bitter
irony, the Japanese were the first nation to use radiation against
a wartime enemy. Years before Hiroshima, Ishii had prisoners'
livers exposed to X-rays.

His work at Pingfan was applauded. Emperor Hirohito may not have
known about Unit 731, but his family did. Hirohito's younger
brother toured the Unit, and noted in his memoirs that he saw films
showing mass poison gas experiments on Chinese prisoners.

Japan's prime minister Hideki Tojo, who was executed for war
crimes in 1948, personally presented an award to Ishii for his
contribution in developing biological weapons. Vast quantities of
anthrax and bubonic plague bacteria were stored at Unit 731. Ishii
manufactured plague bombs which could spread fatal diseases far and
wide. Thousands of white rats were bred as plague carriers, and
fleas introduced to feed on them.

Plague fleas were then encased in bombs, with which Japanese
troops launched biological attacks on reservoirs, wells and
agricultural areas.

Infected clothing and food supplies were also dropped. Villages
and whole towns were afflicted with cholera, anthrax and the
plague, which between them killed over the years an estimated
400,000 Chinese.

One victim, Huang Yuefeng, aged 28, had no idea that by pulling
his dead friend's socks on his feet before burying him he would be
contaminated.

All he knew was that the dead were all around him, covered in
purple splotches and lying in their own vomit. Yuefeng was lucky:
he was removed from a quarantine centre by a friendly doctor and
nursed back to health.

But four relatives died. Yuefeng told Time magazine: "I hate the
Japanese so much that I cannot live with them under the same
sky."

The plague bombing was suspended after the fifth bacterial
bombing when the wind changed direction and 1,700 Japanese troops
were killed.

Before Japan surrendered, Ishii and army leaders were planning
to carry the war to the U.S. They proposed using "balloon bombs"
loaded with biological weapons to carry cattle plague and anthrax
on the jet stream to the west coast of America.

Another plan was to send a submarine to lie off San Diego and
then use a light plane carried on board to launch a kamikaze
mission against the city. The war ended before these suicidal
attacks could be authorised.

As well as Chinese victims, Russians, Mongolians, Koreans and
some prisoners of war from Europe and the U.S. also ended up in the
hands of Ishii, though not all at Unit 731.

Major Robert Peaty, of the Royal Army Ordnance Corps, was the
senior British officer at Mukden, a prisoner-of-war camp 350 miles
from Pingfan. Asked, after the war, what it was like, Peaty
replied: "I was reminded of Dante's Inferno - abandon hope, all ye
who enter here."

In a secret diary, Peaty recorded the regular injections of
infectious diseases, disguised as harmless vaccinations, which were
given to them by doctors visiting from Unit 731. His entry for
January 30, 1943, records: "Everyone received a 5cc
typhoid-paratyphoid A inoculation."

On February 23, his entry read: "Funeral service for 142 dead.
186 have died in 5 days, all Americans." Further "inoculations"
followed.

Why, then, after the war, were nearly all the scientists at Unit
731 freed? Why did Dr Josef Mengele, the N!azi 'Angel of Death' at
Auschwitz, have to flee to South America and spend the rest of his
life in hiding, while Dr Shiro Ishii died at home of throat cancer
aged 67 after a prosperous and untroubled life?

The answer is that the Japanese were allowed to erase Unit 731
from the archives by the American government, which wanted Ishii's
biological warfare findings for itself.

In the autumn of 1945, General MacArthur granted immunity to
members of the Unit in exchange for research data on biological
warfare.

After Japan's surrender, Ishii's team fled back across China to
the safety of their homeland. Ishii ordered the slaughter of the
remaining 150 "logs" in the compound and told every member of the
group to "take the secret to the grave", threatening death to
anybody who went public.

Vials of potassium cyanide were issued in case anyone was
captured. The last of his troops blew up the compound.

From then on, a curtain of secrecy was lowered. Unit 731 was not
part of the Tokyo War Crimes Tribunal. One reference to "poisonous
serums" being used on the Chinese was allowed to slip by for lack
of evidence.

Lawyers for the International Prosecution Section gathered
evidence which was sent directly to President Truman. No more was
heard of it.

The Americans took the view that all this valuable research data
could end up in the hands of the Soviets if they did not act fast.
This was, after all, the kind of information that no other nation
would have had the ruthlessness to collect.

Thus the Japanese were off the hook. Unlike Germany, which
atoned for its war crimes, Japan has been able to deny the evidence
of Unit 731. When, as now, it does admit its existence, it refuses
Chinese demands for an apology and compensation on the grounds that
there is no legal basis for them - since all compensation issues
had been settled by a treaty with China in 1972.

Many of the staff at Unit 731 went on to prominent careers. The
man who succeeded Ishii as commander of Unit 731, Dr Masaji Kitano,
became head of Green Cross, once Japan's largest pharmaceutical
company.

Many ordinary Japanese citizens today would like to witness a
gesture of atonement by their government. Meanwhile, if they want
to know what happened, they can visit the museum that the Chinese
government has erected in the only building at Pingfan which was
not destroyed.

It does not have the specimens kept at Unit 731: the jars
containing feet, heads and internal organs, all neatly labelled; or
the six-foot-high glass jar in which the naked body of a Western
man, cut vertically in two pieces, was pickled in formaldehyde.

But it does give an idea of what this Asian Auschwitz was like.
In the words of its curator: "This is not just a Chinese concern;
it is a concern of humanity."

tbs

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Sonntag, 22. September 2013, 22:41

Verzeihung, falls schon gepostet. Hatte ich eben erst woanders gefunden. Geht u.a. um die Philippinen.
Sorry das ich mir das nicht durchlese. Aber vielleicht kannst du uns langen-englischtext-nicht-Leser das schmackhaft machen und den in Inhalt in 2-3 Sätzen zusammenfassen. ;)

tbs
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Ihnen ist der Erhalt der Community wichtig, dann können Sie das Forum entweder über eine Spende oder über den Souvenir Shop unterstützen.

Diskussionen zu meinen Beiträgen sind explizit gewünscht........

  • »Inselmensch« ist der Autor dieses Themas

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3

Montag, 23. September 2013, 18:18

Philippinen-relevant ist dieser Teil unten. Ich hatte den gesamten Text eingestellt, weil er den Zusammenhang herstellt.

Der Phil. Teil bezieht auf eine nicht-genannte Stadt im Sueden der Phils. Vermutlich Mindanao, da man auch von 'tribes people' spricht. Ein aelterer japanischer Herr kehrt jedes Jahr zurueck, um einige wohltaetige Aktionen durchzufuehren. Im 2. WK hatte er dort 1945 zwei philippinische Maedchen und acht andere Filipinos lebendig zerteilt. Der Beitrag spricht von PoW, aber dies ist wohl falsch. Es waren eher Zivilgeiseln. Die Eingeweide wurden dann japan. Soldaten als Anschauungsunterricht gezeigt. Die Morde waren aber eher eine Repressalie gegen den Widerstand. Aehnlich, wie die Naz!is nach 1945 redet sich der Mann mit einem "putativen Noetigungszustand" heraus, er behauptet er haette sich nicht weigern koennen. Im deutschen Fall ist nich eine einzige Exekution von Leuten bekannt geworden, die sich geweigert hatten. (Nur als Randbemerkung)

Der Fund ist nur ein schlimmes Detail, aber vielleicht neu fuer einige hier auf dem Forum. Aehnliche Verbrechen geschahen auch in Indonesien.


Akira Makino is a frail widower living near Osaka in Japan. His

only unusual habit is to regularly visit an obscure little town in

the southern Philippines, where he gives clothes to poor children

and has set up war memorials.



Mr Makino was stationed there during the war. What he never told

anybody, including his wife, was that during the four months before

Japan's defeat in March 1945, he dissected ten Filipino prisoners

of war, including two teenage girls. He cut out their livers,

kidneys and wombs while they were still alive. Only when he cut

open their hearts did they finally perish.



These barbaric acts were, he said this week, "educational", to

improve his knowledge of anatomy. "We removed some of the organs

and amputated legs and arms. Two of the victims were young women,

18 or 19 years old. I hesitate to say it but we opened up their

wombs to show the younger soldiers. They knew very little about

women - it was sex education."



Why did he do it? "It was the order of the emperor, and the

emperor was a god. I had no choice. If I had disobeyed I would have

been killed." But the vivisections were also a revenge on the

"enemy" - Filipino tribespeople whom the Japanese suspected of

spying for the Americans.



Mr Makino's prisoners seem to have been luckier than some: he

anaesthetised them before cutting them up. But the secret

government department which organised such experiments in

Japanese-occupied China took delight in experimenting on their

subjects while they were still alive.

Ulf8222

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Mittwoch, 25. September 2013, 04:05

ja,stimmt

vielen dank für dein Beitrag,
Habe alles gut gelesen ,da ich bei uns das gleiche kenne.
Gräber so hoch wie Berge,die Anzahl ist unbekannt.
Dort gibt es nur Augenzeugen unter der Bevölkerung,keine Zeugen mehr(alle Tot)
Es handelt sich um Chinesen,die von Japanern abgeschlachtet worden sind,und laut aussage ,an einen Tag alle mit einmal. :denken
Philippinen, glaube ich hat viele Geheimnisse in dieser Richtung,die noch nicht bekannt sind.

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Samstag, 28. September 2013, 09:14

Lieber Ulf,
danke fuer die Infos. Kannst Du uns vielleicht noch mehr und mit Details berichten? Der Ort waere interessant und was die alten Leute den so berichtet haben. Interessant ist, dass die lokalen Chinesen massakriert wurden. Das scheint tatsaechlich ein Muster der japanischen Besatzungspolitik in Suedostasien gewesen zu sein. Aehnlich der deutschen "Lebensraum"-Politik in Europa.

Ich finde das Thema auch wichtig, um die Haltung vieler Filipinos gegenueber den Japanern zu verstehen.

Inselmensch

6

Sonntag, 29. September 2013, 13:37

Der Inhalt dieses Berichtes beschaeftigt sich mit, von japanischen Aerzten veruebten, medizinischen Experimentan an lebenden Menschen. Das groesste Lager war waehrend des 2-ten Weltkrieges in der Manchurei. Dort wurde mit Bakterien, Viren und Seuchen an der Bevoelkerung experimentiert. In dem Lager wurden die Auswirkungen an lebenden Koerpern untersucht und getested. Auf Schmerzmittel und dergleichen wurde bewusst verzichtet, da man annahm dass diese die Ergebnisse verfaelschen wuerden. Auch wurden weitere medizinische Experimente an den lebenden Opfer vorgenommen. Erwaehnt wird das entnehmen des Magens und dirket Anschluss des Darms and die Speiseroehre, wiederanbringen eines amputierten Beines an der falschen Seite etc.

Die Einfuehrung mit den Vermerk auf eine Ort im Sueden der Philippinen spricht von einem aelterem Japaner, der jaehrlich fuer einen wohltaetigen Grund kommt. Er hat damals 10 Filipinos am lebendigen Leib seziert. Unter anderem zwei junge Maedchen, um die inneren Organe einer Frau seinen juengeren Kollegen zu zeigen (als Sexualunterricht). Es ging hauptsaechlich um die anatomische Weiterbildung der japanischen Aerzte. Seine Opfer haetten etwas Glueck gehabt, im Vergleich zu anderen haette er Betaeubungsmittel verabreicht.

Das war grob zusammengefasst der Hauptinhalt des Berichtes
Signatur von »inexile«
"Eine Expertise ist eine objektive Niederschrift einer subjektiven Meinung"

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Sonntag, 29. September 2013, 23:17

Zeit

Lieber Ulf,
danke fuer die Infos. Kannst Du uns vielleicht noch mehr und mit Details berichten? Der Ort waere interessant und was die alten Leute den so berichtet haben. Interessant ist, dass die lokalen Chinesen massakriert wurden. Das scheint tatsaechlich ein Muster der japanischen Besatzungspolitik in Suedostasien gewesen zu sein. Aehnlich der deutschen "Lebensraum"-Politik in Europa.

Ich finde das Thema auch wichtig, um die Haltung vieler Filipinos gegenueber den Japanern zu verstehen.

Inselmensch


dazu brauche ich noch zeit um die zusammenhänge dort auf zu listen.
Der Ort liegt in den Bergen ,weit ab von der Küste.(es führt keine Strasse dort hin)
Nicht jeder kommt dort hin,aber das ist andere Sache-
Der Alte Mann erzählte mir von vielen Lagern und auch von Depots,auch von der Zeit dort, an den Tag.
Er dürfe nicht erzählen einen Fremden,er hat Angst,
Ein einen Tag gab es sehr viele Tote ,wohl alle die dort waren,auch haben die Leute ,noch heute Angst dort.
Viele fragen mich warum alle Tot, an einen Tag. :denken
Dazu gibt es mehre Varianten und Vorstellungen.

Der
Berg wird gepflegt und auch ständig gemäht,auf frage wär das Bezahlt(keiner weiß, wär das bezahlt,) :denken
das ganze soll sich in Juni/Juli 1944 zu getragen haben.
Es stimmt ,aber Philippinen haben kein Interesse an Aufklärung ,so mein erster Eindruck. :denken

trivial

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Montag, 30. September 2013, 15:40

Danke für den Bericht.
Dass die Japaner im 2. Weltkrieg in Sachen Grausamkeit, Skrupellosigkeit und Bösartigkeit den Nationalsozialisten um nichts nachgestanden sind, ist bekannt. Diese Geschichte ist ein weiterer Puzzlestein, der dies bestätigt.

Erschreckend finde ich, dass viele japanische Gräueltaten anscheinend nicht hinreichend aufgearbeitet sind. Meines Wissens häufig in der japanischen Gesellschaft häufig sogar jedes Unrechtsbewusstsein bezüglich des 2. Weltkriegs.

Ich sehe eine solche Aufklärung weniger in der Verantwortung von Ländern wie den Philippinen, welche im 2. Weltkrieg nur ein ausgenutztes Opfer waren, als in jener der Täter oder zumindest der siegreichen Alliierten.

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Dienstag, 1. Oktober 2013, 10:31

Ulff,
Danke fuer die Infos. War das eine Bergbaugegend? Es koennte ja sein, dass dort Zwangsarbeit stattfand. Falls diese Gegend dann in den Einzugsbereicht das amerikanischen Vormarschs nach der Landung auf Leyte lag, dann koennte man das Massaker mit dieser erklaeren. Also vielleicht eher 1945 als 1944?

In Japan gibt es tatsaechlich sehr merkwuerdige Leute. Ich war vor knapp 20 Jahren auf einer Tagung und ein Gastdoktorand der Universitaet Leiden (NL) aus Japan hatte die Frechheit eine Vortrag zu halten in dem er dann Vorschlug den Begriff "Besatzung" durch 'gemeinsame Wohlstandzone' (den genauen Begriff kann ich nachschlagen). Das war nichts anderes als die offizielle japanische Sprachregelung der Kriegsjahre.
Die indonesischen Historiker sind im Detail auf die Menschenexperimente auf Java eingegangen.

Spaeter sprache ich bei einer anderen Gelegenheit mit einer japanischen Kollegin, die bedauerte, dass solche Rechtsradikale leider immer noch gefoerdert wuerden. Die Verehrung als Quasigoetter von Massenmoerden ist leider immer noch Teil der japanischen Gegenwart.

Mit Bezug auf die Philippinen muss man konstatieren, dass einer Erforschung eigentlich sehr wenig entgegensteht. Die Materialien sind frei zugaenglich, sofern man die noetigen Mittel aufwenden kann. Diese willentliche Gedaechtnislosigkeit kann u.U. mit der Rolle lokaler Eliten zusammenhaengen. Es waere schon interessant zu sehen, wie sich diese Klans mit den Besatzern arrangiert hatten oder eben auch nicht.

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Mittwoch, 2. Oktober 2013, 18:45

wohl mehr Forschung und Arbeitslager

Es gibt nur paar hinweise ,das Dort ein Arbeitslager und Forschungslabor war.
Nein ,noch mal ,nicht im Jahre 1945.
Genau im Zeitraum 1944 Juni /Juli.

Was auffällt ,ist noch heute die Angst der Leute,so sollen auch alle Japaner Tot sein dort. :denken
Es sol Untiere dort geben,aber keiner kann genau sagen wie sie aus sehen. :denken
Was es gibt sind viele Schlangen,Wildscheine die gleich angreifen und beißen und viele Affen am Rande von Urwald.

Bergbau ,weiß ich nicht ,habe dort keinen Schacht gefunden oder hinweise,nur ein Berg ist halb ,abgestützt ist.

Leute sind dort nicht hin gekommen,es gab Sperrzonen.

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11

Donnerstag, 3. Oktober 2013, 09:57

Alles sehr mysterioes. Die Kollegen aus Indonesien erzaehlten von medizinischen und chemischen Versuchen. Also Kampfmittel, die man auf Java erprobte. Das koennte auch hier der Fall, da die Gegend anscheinend sehr abgelegen ist.

Es waere sehr interessant mehr zu erfahren. Vielleicht koennen wir ja ueber google ein wenig mehr herausfinden. Ich bin mir ziemlich sicher, dass die National Archives in Collega Park, Maryland, Material haben. Schliesslich waren die U.S. hinter solchen japanischen Einheiten besonders hinterher. Weniger aus rechtlichen, sondern eher aus praktischen Erwaegungen.